Professor Ahmed Rubaai Named an IEEE Fellow

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Electrical Engineering Professor Ahmed Rubaai has been named an IEEE Fellow and is being recognized for “Contributions to The Development of High-Performance Controls for Electric Motor Drives.”

Dr. Rubaai’s contributions are oriented towards industrial applications that IEEE, the association for engineers, serves. His work covers a broad range of manufacturing and product applications, and exemplifies his ability to bridge between academic research and the application to industrial applications.

The IEEE grade of fellow is conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors upon a person with an outstanding record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. The total number selected in any one year cannot exceed one-tenth of one- percent of the total voting membership. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

The IEEE is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its 400,000 members in 160 countries, the IEEE is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics.

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